5. Reporting on corruption

“Any journalist and editor will always prefer to run a hard-hitting investigative story like this that does include named sources.” –Drew Nelles The threat to snow plow workers is real. Weeks before Maisonneuve released the Winter 2011 issue, a projectile akin to a Molotov cocktail was thrown through the window of a snow removal company […]

3. Anonymity and believability

Anonymity and Believability “What does the journalist have to offer to these ordinary people, who ‘give a human face’ to their stories?” – Isabel Awad, Journalists and their Sources: Lessons from Anthropology In most circumstances, anonymity should be seen as a last resort for journalists. As David Boeyink wrote in the Journal of Mass Media […]

2. Implied consent

In general, all conversations with journalists are assumed to be on the record unless the interviewee specifically requests otherwise beforehand. The journalist should identify him or herself and explain what they are writing about. According the New York University’s journalism handbook, dealings of what can be attributed to a source, and what cannot, must be […]

Getting Plowed: anonymity and sources on the record

Case study by Aaron Hutchins December, 2012 Getting Plowed is a feature-length investigative report about the snow removal industry in Montreal and its “turf wars”. The article was the cover story for the Winter 2011 edition of Maisonneuve magazine. Journalist Selena Ross tells the stories of snow plow employees or private contractors who have had […]